First Coast News Anchor Jeannie Blaylock has a New Mission: To tell you about DOGGY CHECK

We absolutely love our rescue dog, Riley, but I didn’t even think about it—I do a self-breast exam to look for lumps on myself, and I’d never checked my dog!

One day I was petting Riley and discovered a hard, teeny knot the size of a BB in Riley’s ear. I couldn’t see the lump, but it felt like a small rock. I brought it to the attention of Dr. Carlos Aragon at BluePearl Animal Hospital in Orange Park, and he agreed it’d be smart to run some tests.

I’m so glad we did. That seemingly insignificant bump was mast cell cancer, the most common skin tumor in dogs. We were lucky to catch it very early—clean margins, no cancer treatment even necessary. Riley lost a chunk of his ear, but thankfully he’s “cancer free.” Hooray!

“In just a few months, Riley’s cancer could have grown to the size of a walnut. That’s dangerous because when mast cell cancers metastasize, they can invade the spleen and liver and kill,” says Dr. Tracy LaDue, a Veterinary Radiation Oncologist at SEVO-MED in Orange Park. “50% of dogs over the age of ten get cancer. But it can happen in younger dogs, as well,” she informed us. Riley is only four!

Our plan is to stay on top of this Doggie Check routine for Riley, as 40% of dogs with mast cell cancers will get another cancerous tumor.

Please don’t let something suspicious go on for months without saying anything to your vet. “And remember,” Dr. LaDue says, “some canine cancers feel hard and some feel soft.” Sneaky cancer. We’re coming for you.

A cancer might look like a pimple or a bug bite. This is a mast cell cancer on a dog.

According to the doctors at SEVO Med: Use the F-U-R-R-Y method to catch cancer early

F – Feet
Check between toes. Look under feet and between pads. “Look for any abnormal swelling,” Dr. LaDue says. “Make sure there aren’t any lumps or bumps.”

U – Underneath
“One of the places people miss is armpits,” she says. “It’s not a typical place we look on dogs.” So check the armpits and look under your dog on their bellies. Check under chins, as well. We pet heads all the time, but feel in places you don’t normally pet.

R – Raise Their Tails
As Dr. LaDue puts it, “Open the hatch!” Inspect for swellings and lumps. And for dogs older than 6—a rectal exam. They can get prostate cancer and anal sac tumors. So look for a growth or anything suspicious. Ask your veterinarian to take a looksee.

R – Raise Their Ears
People forget to look inside their dog’s ears. (Check outside, too.)

Y – Yapper
Look inside your dog’s mouth. Lift the lips. Inspect for lumps or bleeding or an especially bad odor.

 

SEVO-Med Offers compassionate guidance when you need it most.
Orange Park (904) 278-3870
Jacksonville (904) 567-7519
sevomed.com | info@sevomed.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unleash Jacksonville’s Freedom Dog Partaaay at Brewhound

Come with or without your dog and let’s party!

No one throws a dog party like Unleash Jacksonville! Come help celebrate the print release of our FREEDOM issue and check out the joy that is BrewHound Dog Park + Bar (if you haven’t already).

Vendors: Meet Unleash Jacksonville’s fantastic partners who helped to make this issue come to life, including Salty Paws Healthy Pet Market – Atlantic Beach, Beach Bark, Beaches Jet Set Pets, Sole’ Spa Wellness Center, Pet Supplies Plus – Jacksonville, Rodo Dog Wear, Revyv Nuts, and many more!

Get KISSED! Dobby & Gretel, our FREEDOM cover models will be giving kisses ;). Meet adorable adoptable dogs from The London Sanctuary and Animal Care & Protective Services. FREE Secret Life of Pets 2 Stuffies for kids (while supplies last). Enjoy lovely  drinks, food, and fun for all. FREE raffle ticket for your chance to win lots of great stuff. Additional tickets can be purchased to benefit Beagle Freedom Project.

ADMISSION is FREE in the leashed areas – All friendly leashed dogs are welcome on “The Porch” free of charge.
“The Yard” off-leash park access – $8/dog (if not a member) to enter the off leash park, and must bring shot records.

FOSTER PARENTS: Please feel free to bring your dog friendly fosters and have their ADOPT ME vests on. If you WILL be bringing your foster (if you think about it) please post a photo of them and their name on the discussion for the event so we know to look out for ya!

Natural ways to help alleviate your dog’s anxiety

Natural ways to help alleviate your dog’s anxiety
From the FREEDOM ISSUE / By Janice Frank

 

For many dogs, summertime can be a terrifying time of year (mine are raising their paws over here). Jarring sounds from thunderstorms and fireworks that sometimes come out of the blue are no picnic for pups! It’s natural for them to be afraid of loud noises, as the sounds trigger their nervous system, causing anxiety and fear. Visible signs of distress may include heavy panting, pacing or shaking, yawning, drooling and licking, hiding, and even really funky odor—AKA fear funk.

Pet parents can feel absolutely helpless during these times! Obvious safety measures should be taken, such as creating a small space indoors away from windows, using background sounds from the tv, soothing music or a white noise machine. However, for many dogs, these efforts provide little relief.

So, what are pet parents to do? Well, you could completely sound-proof your home to eradicate any sputter of pyrotechnics, or you could pack everyone up and drive to a cave far from any sign of festivities. Unwilling to do these options? Don’t blame ya. Let’s explore some practical, drug-free ways we can help alleviate anxiety in our pets, shall we?

(I personally like to seek out natural ways to help my dogs, and I’ve seen great results. But if this isn’t your jam, then please consult your veterinarian for additional ways to help your dogs.)

Steve Huber, owner of Earth Pets Natural Food Store, suggests when looking for calming aids to treat sudden triggers, seek out fast-acting GABA-producing herbs such as as Valerian root and Passion Flower as lead ingredients. GABA, technically known as Gamma Aminobutyric Acid, is an important neurotransmitter naturally produced by the brain. When released, it works to inhibit nerve impulses in the brain and nervous system, effectively balancing stress response. Research has found that too little GABA in the nervous system can contribute to feelings of panic and anxiety. Other known supplements such as CBD, while an effective anxiety reliever, is not fast acting and requires some time to build up in the body. If your dog tends to suffer from general anxiety, Steve recommends you start with a good quality daily CBD supplement and combine with a GABA-producing herbal aid during acutely stressful events.
So what are these magical herbs all about? Turns out, these chill plants have been around and used in medicine for quite some time. Here’s the rundown:

Valerian is an herb native to Asia and Europe whose root has been used in traditional medicine for over 2,000 years! Often referred to as “Nature’s Valium,” this fast-acting herb signals the brain to release the calming chemical, GABA.

Passion Flower lowers brain activity while boosting GABA. Both Passion Flower and Valerian work to inhibit the breakdown in the brain similar to Valium and Xanax, but without the side effects.

Ashwagandha is a Chinese herb classified as an adaptogen, meaning it helps the body to manage stress by blocking the stress pathway by regulating chemical signaling in the nervous system. This serves as a great general anxiety reliever and also complimentary to Valerian root and Passion Flower.

Chamomile is another well-studied constituent, and serves as a mild sedative and anti-anxiety, muscle-relaxing antispasmodic.

Talk about plant power! These herbs come from Mother Nature’s medicine cabinet and can be a tremendous help in soothing our pets without leaving them wonky-eyed or comatose. Look for supplements produced in the correct dosage for pets, and if your dog is taking medications, please do your research to make sure taking herbs is okay.

Cheers to a calm and tranquil summer for everyone! •

The staff at Earth Pets is more than happy to help if you have questions about natural support in dealing with your pet’s anxiety.

/ Earth Pets Natural Food Store
11740 San Jose Blvd., Jacksonville • (904) 677-4429

Too Hot To Trot – Preventing Heat stroke in Dogs

Amy Olivieri | Too Hot To Trot – Preventing Heat stroke in Dogs |  Freedom issue

 

Too Hot To Trot – Preventing Heat stroke in Dogs

Picture it — a gorgeous summer day in Florida and you’re feeling gooood! The weather’s a perfect 81 degrees­—ahhhhh! You look at your dog, your dog looks at you … How about a run, bud? Your dog gives you a lick on the knee to say he’s in. You lace up them kicks and grab the leash.

But, wait … and here’s a crazy thought …. how about you … maybe … don’t grab the leash? It’s pretty hot outside, so it might just be best for you go for a run without your dog.

I totally get it—not the running part, I discourage myself from running any time of the year—the dog wanting/needing exercise part. But we need to be smart as the adult in this relationship. After working in an animal emergency hospital and seeing a dog die from wearing a costume on a warm day, or going for a run on a hot day, or being left in the car while the owner “just ran in,” I feel the need to educate people about heat stroke. I realize most people just don’t know how quickly it can happen and how serious it is. Honestly, I had no idea myself! But I’ve seen the heartache (and subsequent self blame) that pet parents go through every day. The self blame is the worst. I should’ve known. I should’ve prevented this.

I get reallllly upset when I see people running their dogs in the midday heat or hanging out on the beach with no shade or water. The dog is panting so hard, but keeps going because he has to. Can you imagine wearing a fur coat, not being able to sweat, and then being told to exercise in the blazing Florida sun? (I don’t even like to wear a t-shirt, but I do for y’alls sake).

Dogs aren’t able to sweat out excess body heat. The only sweat glands your dog has are on his paws and they’re actually kind of crappy for regulating body temperature. Instead of sweating, your dog expels the excess heat through panting. Normally, panting is enough to relieve him of the excess heat. However, when panting isn’t enough, heatstroke becomes a real risk.

Your dog’s normal resting temperature is about 100.5 to 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit. If his temperature were to rise above 105 degrees, he’d begin to experience effects of heat stroke. At 106 to 108 degrees, he’d begin to suffer irreversible damage to his kidneys, liver, gastrointestinal tract, heart, and brain.

I don’t want to sound like an alarmist, here, but please understand that heat stroke is extremely serious—if not treated in a timely manner it can cause the dog’s organs to completely shut down and his heart to stop altogether. And for certain breeds, it can happen just hanging out in the backyard. Aw heck naw, not on my watch! Let’s learn how to prevent this!

Early signs.
Excessive panting will be your first red flag. Other early signs may be more subtle—your dog might seem less responsive to commands than usual. When you call his name, instead of turning to look at you, he may wander away. He may also be unable or unwilling to move around. The Humane Society of the United States adds that signs of potential heat stroke include glazed eyes, excessive drooling, a rapid heart rate, dizziness or lack of coordination, lethargy, or loss of consciousness. If there’s any question at all, get your dog out of the heat. A dangerously overheated dog may collapse or experience seizures, vomit or have diarrhea. His gums or tongue may turn blue or bright red.

When to exercise.
So … how do you decide whether to grab the leash when you’re ready to go for a bike ride, rollerblade, or run? According to Dr. Justine A. Lee, DVM, a general rule stems from working with sled dogs—If the temperature plus humidity added together are greater than 150, it’s too hot for your dog to exercise!
( I’ll do the math for ya: Temperature: 75°F, Humidity level: 80%
75 + 80 = 155 >>> Too hot to run. YES, heat stroke can happen even at 75 degrees in certain dogs. )

Choose to exercise your dog during non-peak heat hours—very early in the morning or late in the evening (the pavement will be cooler then, too, so no burnt paws).

What if it happens?
Recognizing the symptoms and responding quickly is essential. Call your vet or emergency vet as soon as you can.

1. Get into the shade ASAP. If you think your dog is suffering from heat stroke, move him into a shaded area and out of direct sunlight.

2. Apply cool water to the inner thighs and stomach of the dog, where there’s a higher concentration of relatively superficial, large blood vessels. Use cool—not cold—running water. A faucet or hose is the best way to wet down your dog’s body. Don’t submerge your dog in water, such as in a pool or tub—this could cool the dog too rapidly, leading to further complications.

Using ice or extremely cold water is actually counterproductive to this process, as it will cause the blood vessels to constrict, which slows blood flow, slowing the cooling process.

3. Apply cool water to the foot pads. Rubbing alcohol may also be applied to the footpads to dilate pores and increase perspiration.

4. Don’t cover the dog. One of the keys to successfully cooling your dog is ensuring the water being placed on the dog can evaporate. Don’t cover an overheated dog with a wet towel or blanket. This inhibits evaporation and creates a sauna effect around your dog’s body. Also, don’t wet the dog down and put it into an enclosed area, such as a kennel. Any air flow during the cooling process is helpful in reducing the dog’s body temperature. Sitting with the wet dog in a running car with the air conditioner blowing is an ideal cooling situation.

5. Keep the dog moving. Try to encourage your dog to stand or walk slowly as it cools down. The circulating blood tends to pool in certain areas if the dog is lying down, thus preventing the cooled blood from circulating back to the core.

6. Give small amounts of water. Cooling the dog is the first priority. Hydration is the next. Don’t allow the dog to gulp water. Instead, offer small amounts of cool water, not cold. If the dog drinks too much water too rapidly, it could lead to vomiting or bloat.
Performance beverages designed for humans are not recommended because they’re not formulated with the canine’s physiology in mind. If you can’t get an overheated dog to drink water, try offering chicken- or beef-based broths.

7. Get to your butts to the vet or emergency vet as soon as you can. Like, pronto.

Listen, living in Florida we need to be extra aware of how the heat is affecting our pets. As you may have noticed, it gets pretty darn hot in the summer, but heat stroke can occur in the spring or fall as well. In general, make sure your dog gets plenty of water, air circulation, and shade, and remember the self-cooling ability depends on the dog. Short-snouted breeds like bulldogs or pugs can’t cool themselves as easily through panting. Dog breeds that originated in cold climates (like huskies, malamutes, and newfoundlands) also typically have a harder time adjusting to the heat.

Hopefully this was just a refresher for you—you already knew how to keep your dog safe in the heat, right? Please don’t be afraid to speak up (in a kind way) if you think someone else’s dog is in danger. You could save a life! •

PS! Headed to the beach? Bring shade and fresh water for your dog … unless you want a good talkin’ to.

/ Too Hot To Trot – Preventing Heat stroke in Dogs | Freedom Issue | June/July 2019

Hü Poupe’d

By Anonymous / Originally published in Unleash Jacksonville, DUTY issue

*Not the actual culprit in THIS story

We’ve recently started using this adorable little french phrase in our home—Hü Poupe´d. I don’t expect you to be able to pronounce it—it’s rathar fancy-pants—but, roughly, it translates to “who pooped” in English. I personally like to say it three times in a row, while looking at my suspects directly into their eyeballs. Surprisingly enough, in our house, the one who doesn’t look away is most often the one hü poupe´d (he’s a brazen boydog and uses the “But I’m Paralyzed” card every. single. time.)

We don’t really need to ask this question. It’s always that same guy. We ask it, hoping for some sign of remorse, as he will stare back at me—through me really—as if to say, Yah I did it and it was awesome. And guess what? In about three hours … gonna do it again. {shrug} Let me know if you wanna watch.

So … I mean … I’m not sure if you’ve ever allowed anyone to go number two in your home consistently and repeatedly, but if not, I’ll give you an insider’s perspective—it makes you feel downright disgusting. It makes you want to wash your feet sixteen times a day, that’s for sure, and it makes you not want to have anyone over for a decent lasagna dinner.

During a recent storm, I was looking for one of our pups who tends to be frightened, and I took a little look-see under my bed. That’s when life changed forever. I did find him there, curled up in his safe zone …. but I also found something else—well, let’s see … imagine the biggest turd you can think of. Go ahead and multiply it by two and add six. It was massive, it was impressive. Huh. I wonder how long that’s been there, I whispered out loud to no one. And then, crouched there, gazing under my bed at the silhouette of a massive turd … I wondered how I got here. Not knowing how long a turd has been under my bed?! That’s ludacris. I’ve always known how long turds have been under my bed. When did this happen to me and is this how it’s just going to be from now on? How did I not smell it and am I still a good person? (It feels really good to talk about all this—my stinky little secret. Go ahead—tell all your perfect friends that Anonymous is absolutely hideous.)

Since starting to care for this dog who can’t help but accept—nay, be proud of—what he can’t control, I’m begrudgingly learning the same. Ugh, life lessons are so dumb sometimes. I don’t like it. But I do like him. As part of our System of Containment, there is a garbage bag-sized bag of dog poop on my front porch. You do what you gotta do. What of it? Keeps the peeping Toms from staying to long.

I’ve come to realize the answer to my questions, following the discovery of MegaTurd (except how did I not smell it). This has happened to me because, as much as I may want to just take off in a jet plane some days, I’m not a deserter (However, I am a desserter, by the by. Anything warm and chocolate-y.) I love my dogs through thick and thin; barf piles and endless mounds of poo-nami; even old age, I know that’s a crazy notion for some. So, accepting what I cannot immediately change, I better invest in a good steamer and, yah. I do think I’ll check under the bed more often. •

5th annual Bark For Life of Jacksonville

The American Cancer Society Bark For Life is a fun event for dogs and their owners to visit Jacksonville’s first indoor/outdoor dog park and craft beer/coffee bar, plus check out local vendors and services, all while raising funds and awareness for ACS.